Overton County News Overton County News - An Award Winning Newspaper - Livingston, Tennessee
homeabout ussubscriptionskids cornerlocal linkscontact us
News
Events
Society
80 Years Ago
Obituaries
Sports
Weather
Classifieds
Archives

Archives 01-31-2007

 

News

Livingston Academy holds Basketball Homecoming
Jake Brake use, cleaning lots considered in called meeting

Flu forces closing of county schools

 

Livingston Academy holds Basketball Homecoming

Kassie Hunley/OCN Sports
Livingston Academy held the 2007 Basketball Homecoming activities on Tuesday, Jan. 23. Presented from left are Freshman Attendant Shelby Taylor, daughter of Steve and Suzy Taylor, escorted by Jeremy McLearran, son of Billy and Jennifer McLearran, Junior Attendant Maggie Stevens, daughter of J.D. and Marla Stevens, escorted by Todd Smith, son of Joey and Beth Smith, 2007 Basketball Homecoming Queen Alison West, daughter of John and Amanda West, escorted by Tyson Stover, son of Junior and Renea Stover, Senior Attendant Jada Ledbetter, daughter of Ricky and Janice Ledbetter, escorted by Jordan Everley, son of Monte Everley and Rachel Everley, and Sophomore Attendant Kendria Kilgore, daughter of Matthew and Phyllis Kilgore, escorted by Chase Dunn, son of Dale Dunn and Angie Anderson.

 

top of page

Jake Brake use, cleaning lots considered in called meeting

By DEWAIN E. PEEK, OCN staff
Livingston City Council held a called meeting Thursday, Jan. 25 to discuss changes made in the new town charter.

The aldermen voted unanimously to take out a clause barring the use of a Jake Brake inside the city limits.

A Jake Brake, named for the manufacturer that invented the technology, Jacobs Company, is an add-on engine brake for diesel engines that helps slow big rigs on downhill grades. Because it uses engine exhaust, the Jake Brake makes a loud noise when in use.

Though the Jake Brake may not be needed in most city street driving, Livingston does have a few areas where the use of a Jake Brake may be necessary for slowing a rig down.

In a 4-2 vote, the City Council took out a clause in a property clean-up ordinance. The clause had given an exemption for premises on which the property owner lives.

The clause was part of an ordinance stating that any owner, lessee, or occupant of any lot, tract, or parcel of land in the Town of Livingston who permits debris, rubbish, tin cans, or stagnant water to accumulate or a dense growth of trees, vines, grass, and underbrush to develop thereon to such an extent that it constitutes a menace

The new charter also makes additions to this ordinance.

Codes Inspector Darius Sims said, "You're adding farm equipment, machinery, unoccupied trailers, mobile homes, or other abandoned structures not fit for use or habitation and/or any other equipment or materials that is not in use for more than 6 months."

Another addition to the ordinance caused concern among some of the aldermen. Added to the ordinance is a clause taking in any motor vehicle of any type, including but not limited to motor powered vehicles, automobiles, cars, trucks, tractors, buses, trailers, motorcycles, or any other vehicle that requires a State of Tennessee registration or license to operate on a public street or roads, that is not licensed or registered displaying current license plates.

Alderman David Langford said, "I'm against it."

This addition was made to give the town more enforcement power in cleaning up lots.

Sims said, "We have nothing to take care of vehicles on private lots."

As Sims was speaking, Alderman James "Pug” Lee said, “I ain't for it."

Mayor Curtis Hayes said the appearance of the town matters when recruiting new businesses and industry.

"This right here allows you to help clean lots up," Mayor Hayes said. "I mean, you've got to have something inside the city limits that don't allow abandoned vehicles and things of that nature sitting in front yards.

"Right now, we don't have anything. I mean, you've got to have something."

Alderman Lee asked, "Is this going to be in effect to everybody that's in the city of Livingston?"

"Yes," Mayor Hayes answered.

Alderman John McLeod asked about businesses that store vehicles on their property, noting that no exemption was given. Mayor Hayes answered, "This is residential." Alderman Lee continued to express concern with the clause, saying, "What I'm saying on that, I've got two vehicles at my house that neither one of them's been on the road in two years. I could put them on the road, but I don't want them on the road."

Sims informed the aldermen that the old ordinance only pertains to public property and right-of-way.

Aldermen McLeod and Lynn King also voiced concern about how the ordinance will be used.

Sims told them that the end of the ordinance states: to develop thereon to such an extent that it constitutes a menace to life, or property, or to public health.

"It's going to say what you'all are saying," he said. "It might be a judgment call that if you say whether one vehicle can constitute that or it takes 10 to constitute that, I don't know. That might be a judgment thing.

"And in certain situations, one that's tore all to pieces, with fenders and wheels off and what have you, might look worse than five that's just sitting there pretty neat, you know. I don't know.

"But it's going to be hard to do what you want to do without having some kind of guidelines."

Alderman Langford said, "I don't know, but now, one man's eyesore is another man's treasure."

And Alderman McLeod added, "It would require some very careful approaches to it."

A public hearing for the two changes to the new charter has been set for 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 26, with a called meeting of the Board of Aldermen to follow.

Other items in the new charter include changing where the old charter stated that aldermen will receive no pay to now state that aldermen will receive $200 per month.

Mayor Hayes said, "And what that's doing is just putting it in the charter. We've not had an upgrade in our charter since ‘86."

He went on to say, "It's been passed. It's just not been put in the charter."

Another change brought up was a clause stating, "For good cause shown, the mayor may dismiss any city employee, subject to approval of the Board of Aldermen."

This also had been previously approved by the aldermen.

 

 

top of page

 

Flu forces closing of county schools

By Dewain E. Peek, OCN staff
Overton County schools closed Thursday, Jan. 25 and did not reopen until Tuesday, Jan. 30 after a wave of influenza cases went through the system.

According to Director of Schools Mike Gilpatrick, the school system had an absentee rate of 12.5% on Tuesday, Jan. 23, then went up to 13.5% the following day.

"And we had 70 sign-outs on Wednesday," Director Gilpatrick said.

With 10% being the state minimum for closure, and after consulting with area doctors, Director Gilpatrick made the decision to close schools on both Thursday and Friday of last week. He said doctors told him the flu takes about five days to run its course.

After further consideration, Director Gilpatrick also called school off Monday, Jan. 29 due to the flu outbreak. Snow on Sunday night remained on roads Monday morning, so schools would likely have been called off for snow anyway. Schools opened an hour late on Tuesday, Jan. 30 because of the road conditions.

Putnam County and Jackson County schools were also closed Thursday and Friday because of the flu.

 

top of page

 

Overton County News
415 West Main Street
P.O. Box 479
Livingston' Tennessee 38570
tel 931.823.6485
fax 931.823.6486
info@overtoncountynews.com


News
Society
History

Obituaries
Sports

 

News
01-03-2007
01-10-2007
01-17-2007
01-24-2007
01-31-2007







Society
01-03-2007
01-10-2007

01-17-2007
01-24-2007
01-31-2007










 


History

01-03-2007
01-10-2007
01-17-2007
01-24-2007
01-31-2007

 


Obituaries
01-03-2007
01-10-2007
01-17-2007
01-24-2007
01-31-2007



Sports
01-03-2007
01-10-2007
01-17-2007
01-24-2007
01-31-2007


   
Printing Supplies Graphic Design Custom Printing Advertising